Posts Tagged ‘Junk Food Diets’

UK’s five big killers

Five big killers – heart disease, stroke, cancer, lung and liver disease – account for more than 150,000 deaths a year among under-75s in England alone and the Department of Health estimates 30,000 of these are entirely avoidable.UK's five big killersCoronary Heart Disease is the biggest killer, causing almost 74,000 deaths each year in the UK- that’s about 200 people dying every day.

More than a quarter of the deaths occur in people who are younger than 75 and experts say the majority are preventable.

Smoking, being overweight and having high blood pressure are all risk factors.

About one in three adults in England and Scotland have high blood pressure and nearly half of them are not receiving treatment for the condition, says the British Heart Foundation.

Between April 2011 and March 2012 only 2% of those eligible in England actually had a health check. Out of nearly 16 million people eligible, about 425,000 were offered a check and 211,000 took up the offer.

England has one of the highest rates of asthma prevalence in the world. Figures from GP registers in 2008 suggested that about 6% of the English population has asthma.

And more than three million people in England are living with COPD. This lung disease kills about 23,000 people a year in the UK.

The most important cause of COPD is smoking, but about 15% of cases are work-related, triggered by exposure to fumes, chemicals and dusts at work.

Premature deaths from COPD in the UK was almost twice as high as the European average in 2008 and premature mortality for asthma was more than 1.5 times higher.

The disease is one of the most common causes of emergency admission to hospital and is expensive in terms of acute hospital care. It costs nearly 10 times more to treat severe COPD than the mild disease.

Strokes are the third leading cause of death in England each year and the leading cause of disability. More than 150,000 people have a stroke every year in the UK but, according to The Stroke Association, up to 10,000 of these could be prevented if more people were aware of the symptoms and sought out emergency treatment.

Symptoms can include facial weakness, speech problems and pins and needles down one side of the body.

The Health Secretary Mr Jeremy Hunt says a major challenge is getting all parts of the country to meet the performance levels of the best.

For example, if all patients suffering from a mini stroke (transient ischaemic attack or TIA) were treated as rapidly as those treated in the top 25% of hospitals, 540 strokes would be avoided each year, which in turn would save the NHS £4.5m a year.

Cancer has now become so common that today one in 30 people living in the UK either has cancer or is in remission. By 2030 it is estimated that three million people in England will have had some form of cancer.

The good news is that cancer survival rates are now improving in the UK.

More men are now surviving prostate and bowel cancer and women with breast cancer have a better outlook than ever before. But the UK still lags behind other European countries in terms of cancer survival.

Cancer Research UK says part of the problem is unhealthy lifestyles. It is estimated that about a third of cancers are caused by smoking, diet, alcohol and obesity.

And many cancers are detected too late. Although there are national screening programmes for certain cancers, like breast and cervical, public awareness of symptoms and the need to seek help early is still too low.

Another issue is access to treatment. Waiting times to see a doctor for speedy diagnosis and treatment have come down. But the provision of certain types of cancer investigations and treatments across the UK is variable and some groups of society, like the very old, can miss out.

Lastly, the Chief Medical Officer of England, Prof Dame Sally Davies, highlighted liver disease as an issue in her annual report.

It is the only major cause of mortality and morbidity that is on the increase in England while it is decreasing among European peers.

Between 2000 and 2009, deaths from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis in the under 65s in England increased by about 20% while they fell by the same amount in most EU countries. And all three major causes of liver disease – obesity, undiagnosed infection, and, increasingly, harmful drinking – are preventable.

More than a third of men and over a quarter of women regularly exceed the government recommended level of alcohol intake – three to four units of alcohol a day for men and two to three units for women.

The government in England is currently considering whether to set a minimum unit price for alcohol to deter problem drinking and cut alcohol-related illness.

Share this:

Just one daily fizzy drink linked to higher prostate cancer risk

Drinking just one fizzy drink a day could increase a man’s chance of developing prostate cancer by around 40 per cent, research suggests.Just one daily fizzy drink linked to higher prostate cancer riskMen who consumed 300ml of a sugary soft drink a day appeared to raise their odds of succumbing to faster growing forms of the disease, according to a 15 year study.

The sugar in the drinks is believed to release insulin, which feeds tumours.

The study, carried out by Swedish scientists and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, tracked the health of more than 8,000 men aged 45 to 73 for an average of 15 years.

All were in good health when the study began, and were asked about what they liked to eat and drink.

Those who drank more sugary drinks were more likely to have been diagnosed with prostate cancer by the end of the study.

Isabel Drake, a researcher at Lund University, said: “Among the men who drank a lot of soft drinks, we saw an increased risk of prostate cancer of around 40 per cent.”

Large amounts of rice, pasta, cakes, biscuits and sugary breakfast cereals were also linked with a less serious form of the disease.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and about 36,000 are diagnosed with the disease in the UK each year. It accounts for a quarter of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer in men but most cases develop in those aged 70 or older.

The scientists who carried out the study said that while genetics were more important in determining the likelihood of developing prostate cancer than was the case with many other cancers, diet did seem to be important.

More research was needed to confirm the link with fizzy drinks but there were already “plenty of reasons” to cut back on them, they said.

Share this:

Dieting- it’s all in the timing

Sticking to strict meal times every day is good for the metabolism and helps the body burn off fat according to new research.Dieting- it's all in the timingPeople who snack on healthy food may consume only a small amount of fat- however their haphazard eating patterns mean they can put on weight, a new reserach study suggests.

In contrast, sticking to strict meal times is good for the metabolism and helps the body burn off fat- allowing a more liberal choice of food.

The findings indicate that adopting a fixed timetable for meals could be a more effective method of dieting than trying to cut out fatty foods and might help prevent obesity, researchers said.

Previous studies have shown that both a high fat diet and eating patterns that disrupt the natural body clock can interfere with our metabolism and raise the risk of obesity.

Scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem tested the effects of timing and fat intake on four groups of mice over an 18-week period to determine whether careful scheduling of meals could lower the effects of a high-fat diet.

Half were given a high-fat diet that would normally be expected to make them obese. Of these, a quarter were fed at the same time each day and another quarter could eat as much as they liked, whenever they liked.

The other half were fed a diet that was lower in fat. Again, one quarter had a fixed feeding time, the other had not.

All four of the groups gained weight over the course of the trial, with the group that ate a high-fat diet at irregular intervals unsurprisingly gaining the most weight, while those on a low-fat, scheduled diet gained the least.

But more surprisingly, the mice that had been fed a high-fat diet at regular intervals finished the trial in a better condition than those that ate low fat foods whenever they wanted, despite both groups consuming the same number of calories overall.

The mice in the scheduled, high fat group had 12 per cent lower body weight, 21 per cent lower cholesterol and 1.4 times higher sensitivity to insulin than the unscheduled, low-fat group.

The diet also changed their metabolism so that they burnt off the fats they ingested to produce energy in between meal times, rather than storing the fat in their bodies.

The study was published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.

Share this:

New York bans large sugary drinks

New York City’s health board has passed a law prohibiting the sale of sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces- an act which Mayor Michael Bloomberg says will save lives by reducing obesity.New York bans large sugary drinksNew York City passed the first US ban of oversized sugary drinks in its latest controversial step to reduce obesity and its deadly complications in a nation with a weight problem.

The mayoral appointed city health board outlawed sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces (one pint) nearly everywhere they are sold, except grocery and convenience stores.

Violators of the ban, which does not include diet sodas, face a $200 (£125) fine.

At a news conference at City Hall, Bloomberg heralded the measure’s passage as “the single biggest step any city I think has ever taken to curb obesity.

“We believe that it will help save lives,” he added.

About one third of Americans are obese, and about 10 per cent of the nation’s healthcare bill is tied to obesity related diseases, such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and hypertension, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development .

Share this:

Supermarkets’ luxury ranges contain twice as much fat, salt and sugar as budget versions

Supermarkets’ ‘luxury’ ranges of ready meals can contain more than twice as much fat and salt than the budget, ‘no-frills’ versions, according to a new academic research.Supermarkets' luxury ranges contain twice as much fat, salt and sugar as budget versionsGlasgow University academics said some of the meals should be labelled “damaging” on their packaging after discovering that they contained “shocking” levels of saturated fat, the major cause of heart disease.

After analysing a range of convenience foods produced by five of Britain’s largest supermarket chains, they found the ‘finest’ ranges of ready meals regularly contained up to 100 per cent of fat that should be consumed by an adult in an entire day.

The study, published in Trends in Food Science & Technology, also discovered one serving of a luxury meal contains up to half the guideline daily amount (GDA) of salt.

Mike Lean, chair of human nutrition at the university, said: “Labelling food as ‘extra special’ or ‘finest’ can be misleading for consumers who might expect health benefits at a higher price point.

The study found Sainsbury’s ‘taste the difference’ beef lasagne contains more than twice the saturated fat (77 per cent GDA) than its ‘basics’ version (36 per cent GDA).

It also contained more salt, with the luxury version accounting for 34.5 per cent of GDA compared to 28.8 per cent for the no-frills version.

Similarly, the supermarket’s ‘taste the difference’ shepherd’s pie contained 52.5 per cent of an adult’s recommended daily saturated fat compared to 22 per cent in one from the ‘basics’ range.

Tesco’s ‘finest’ cottage pie ready meals contained 39 per cent of GDA saturated fat compared with 18 per cent for the equivalent dish in the supermarket’s ‘value’ range. There was also twice as much salt, 52 per cent of GDA compared to 25 per cent.

The academics also found that Tesco’s ‘finest’ chicken masala contained far more saturated fat (68 per cent) than the value version (41 per cent).

Share this:

Lack of family dinners and fast food fixation grows obesity in Britain

A lack of family dinners and a fast food fixation has led to a culture of obesity in Britain that has given it the highest proportion of overweight poor people in Europe.Lack of family dinners and fast food fixation grows obesity in BritainAn analysis published in The Lancet found that 29 per cent of poorly educated women in England and 27 per cent of men are obese.

It gives England the fattest proportion of people in Europe from this background – more than twice as many as Italy, Portugal, Spain and Ireland.

Britain’s culture of fast food, poor diet and lack of family dinners- particularly among people on lower incomes, was to blame said the experts.

The report showed wide health inequalities across Europe and warned that these would increase due to the economic climate.

Britain also has one of the higher rates of child poverty with 21 per cent of children living in households earning less than 60 per cent of the average income. This is higher than in some Eastern European countries including Hungary and Estonia.

Prof Peter Goldblatt, of the Institute of Health Equity at University College London, said: “Britain’s obesity problem is well documented, but the worse off you are, the more likely you are to be obese.

“One in eight children entering school in the most deprived areas is obese, compared to one in 16 in the richest. The difference increases through secondary school into adulthood.”

He said Britain had a culture of obesity. “In southern Europe, in particular, there is less fast food and more family dinners. They also have a generally healthy diet, containing a lot of fruit and vegetables.”

Share this:

How models stay slim- from cocaine to eating cotton wool balls

A fashion model has recently spoken of the great lengths some go to in order to achieve the zero sized figure that they are required to have.How models stay slim- from cocaine to eating cotton wool ballsRussian model Kira Dikhtyar said that “packs of cigarettes, daily colonics, laxatives, Phentermine diet pills, Adderal, prescription drugs that suppress the appetite” are just some of the techniques employed by her colleagues to stave off hunger.”

“I’ve heard stories that some modelling agents encourage girls to do speed and cocaine in order to speed up metabolism and eat less.”

“And all kinds of injections are becoming more and more popular, from HCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) injections that go with a 500 calorie diet plan to T3 thyroid injections that healthy models inject in an attempt to speed up their thyroid function, which results in a faster metabolism.”

HCG injections consist of a hormone which is produced during pregnancy and causes the uterus to be enriched with a thick lining of blood vessels and capillaries so that it can sustain a growing foetus. As a prescription medication, HCG injections are often used in fertility therapy, however, they have recently received attention for their use as a potential weight loss aid due to their ability to suppress appetite.

Health authorities have advised against using them as a method of weight loss due to serious side effects such as gallstones, stroke and blood clots.

The 24-year-old model also claimed that some models resort to eating cotton balls in order to fill their stomachs, before saying that she has only been turned away by one designer – Elie Tahari – for the upcoming New York shows for being too thin.

Dikhtyar’s claims come shortly after two major initiatives were put in place to combat such behaviour. In January this year the CFDA released guidelines asking NYFW designers to, amongst other things, ask models for I.D., encourage those with eating disorders to seek help and to provide substantial amounts of healthy food backstage.

Similarly, Vogue magazine launched ‘The Heath Initiative’ in June – a pact between 19 of the magazines’ international editors to encourage a healthier approach to body image within the industry.

From:  http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/From-cocaine-to-eating-cotton-wool-balls-how-models-stay-thin

Share this:

Adverts for junk food should be banned before TV watershed

Junk food advertising should be restricted before the TV watershed of 9pm to help tackle childhood obesity according to Britain’s leading children’s doctor.Adverts for junk food should be banned before TV watershedDr Hilary Cass, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, called on the authorities to stop showing marketing for unhealthy food to reduce its influence on children.

Current advertising regulations are too weak to prevent products that are high in salt, sugar and fat being promoted, Dr Cass said.

She argued the step was necessary because rates of obesity among children and young people had risen dramatically.

“Although they are trying to avoid junk food advertising around specific children’s programmes, you’ve still got it around soaps and other programmes that children watch,” she said.

“So the only realistic way to do it is to have no junk food advertising before the watershed at all.”

Dr Cass, who represents 11,500 children’s health professionals on behalf of the RCPCH, also claimed the Coalition should introduce taxes on soft drinks with high levels of sugar.

Earlier this year, experts backed a so-called “fat tax”, suggesting it could help reduce the number of deaths from heart attacks and strokes by half.

Professor Simon Capewell, from Liverpool University and co-author of the paper published by the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, said: “Much of the nanny state is manipulated by industry which leads to the nanny state generating very cheap junk food through subsidies at Common Agricultural Policy level, and an environment with advertising and marketing seducing us to buy junk food and sweet drinks.

“In this case the nanny state is malignant rather than benign and we’re looking to government to redress the balance.”

Share this:

UK families are wasting billions worth of food

The average UK family wastes £12 billion worth of food each year analysis reveals.UK families are wasting billions worth of foodResults from the government’s Waste & Resources Action Programme (Wrap) show there has been a 13% reduction in household food waste since 2006-7.

The amount thrown away each year has fallen from 8.3m tonnes to 7.2m tonnes.

But Wrap’s chief executive, Dr Liz Goodwin, said food worth £12 billion a year is still being binned. She said the fall in food being thrown away was “very welcome”, but more still had to be done.

“Despite the reduction, the food we waste in homes, which accounts for about half the UK’s food waste, is still worth £12 billion a year as a result of food price inflation.

“And the food that is being wasted throughout the supply chain is significant at a time when food security is a major global issue,” she said.

According to Wrap, high food price inflation means the financial value of food wasted in the UK has remained the same over the last three years, despite less being binned.

It says had the reduction in waste not been achieved, the value of food thrown away would have been at least £2.5 billion more – taking the total to £14.5 billion.

The advisory body, which used data from about 90 local authorities for its research, about a fifth of all food purchased is wasted and more than half the food that is thrown away, about 60%, could have been eaten.

The organisation said its findings suggested the reduction in waste could be in part due to increased food prices and difficult economic conditions.

Wrap said the reduction in food waste had saved local councils in the UK up to £80m a year, because by sending less food to the tip they are incurring lower landfill charges.

Share this:

Children who resist sweets less likely to be obese adults

Children who can resist sweets on the promise of a greater reward later are less likely to be obese as adults new research has has found.Children who resist sweets less likely to be obese adultsResearchers gave four year olds a biscuit or marshmallow sweet and told them that if they did not eat it they would be given another later.

They were filmed for 15 minutes and those who resisted were given another treat.

The researchers from University of Wisconsin found that those children who were able to control their urge to eat the first sweet performed better at school, were able to handle stress more effectively and were less likely to be obese.

Dr Tanya Schlam, from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health’s Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, said: “Interventions can improve young children’s self-control, which may decrease children’s risk of becoming overweight and may have further positive effects on other outcomes important to society such as general health, financial stability, and a reduced likelihood of being convicted of a crime.”

The findings, involving 653 children, were published in The Journal of Pediatrics.

The original experiments with the sweets were completed between 1968 and 1974 and 164 participants were followed-up once they were in their mid-30s.

The researchers found that each minute a child delayed gratification predicted a 0.2 point decrease in adult body mass index, calculated by dividing weight by height squared.

Dr Schlam said: “One explanation for our present findings may be that those who are more successful at delaying gratification at age four also may be more successful in regulating their caloric intake throughout life.”

Share this:

A Business Win website designed by Website Design Cheltenham with online marketing at Search Clinic and SEO Services Cheltenham by SEO Services Cheltenham