Supplements

Herbal food supplement labels may be misleading

Some herbal food supplements do not contain what they claim on the label according to new research.

Herbal food supplement labels may be misleadingThe BBC health series ‘Trust Me, I’m a Doctor’ teamed up with experts from University College London to test a selection of products bought from high street shops or online retailers.

Of 30 ginkgo products tested, eight contained little or no ginkgo extract.  In one case of milk thistle, unidentified substances were present in place of milk thistle.

The UCL team tested around 70 products overall, using two methods – nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high performance thin layer chromatography – to study their composition.

Herbal products can be sold either as food supplements, or as Traditional Herbal Registration (THR) remedies.

In every THR tested, the product contained what was claimed on the label- however the food supplements showed a wide range of quality.

Whilst many food supplements contained high amounts of the herbal ingredient as claimed, several had none at all.

The manufacture of THRs falls under regulation by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA), but herbal food supplements come under the remit of the Food Standards Agency (FSA) and Trading Standards at local authority level. Their manufacture is not regulated.

Head of the UCL research team Professor Michael Heinrich said: “I think some of the suppliers of food supplements are lying. In other cases I think they don’t know what they’re doing. Many of the botanical drugs come from rare or increasingly rare species, so it makes perfect sense to get something cheaper…which helps to you get a better price at a lower cost.”

He warned consumers that a high price tag was no guarantee of quality.

A spokesman for the Food standards Agency said: “The FSA champions the rights of consumers and misleading them in this way is unacceptable.”

He said a herbal food supplement would be investigated if a complaint was made about a specific product, if members of the public were to fall ill as a result of taking these products, or if evidence of mislabelling were provided.

The results of the BBC/UCL tests have been passed on to the FSA’s Food Crimes Unit.

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Call for better regulation of caffeine diet pills

Caffeine supplements labelled as diet pills should be better regulated according to the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

Caffeine supplements branded as diet pills should be better regulated according to the Royal Pharmaceutical Society

It follows the death of Chris Wilcock from Darwen, Lancashire, who died on the day that he took the tablets- which were the equivalent to 300 cups of coffee.

A coroner ruled his death in April was due to caffeine toxicity. At least four deaths in the UK have been linked to caffeine pills in the past year.

Neal Patel, from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, said regulation was a “problem”.

“Unfortunately it does seem to fall between the Food Standards Agency and the medicine agencies and, in fact, it tends to be left to Trading Standards locally to pick out the products and see what’s in them.

“That doesn’t seem good enough given the number of deaths we’ve seen this year.”

Mr Patel added: “There is really flimsy evidence at best that caffeine can help reduce weight.”

Mr Wilcock, who was a pub landlord, died after taking a supplement known as T5, which contained caffeine equivalent to 300 cups of coffee.

T5 is a generic name for products that are often marketed as slimming aids. They are classified as food supplements instead of medicines, are legal and widely available.

Mr Wilcock’s fiancée Heather Thompson said she “tried to talk him out of” taking the pills.

“He just got told to take one a day and avoid alcohol with them – that was it. He didn’t get told of the side effects, he didn’t get told anything. It didn’t even say it on the actual bottle.”

The Royal Pharmaceutical Society said caffeine overdose could lead to symptoms including palpitations, high blood pressure, nausea and vomiting, convulsions and, in some cases, death.

The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency added: “There is a variety of different ingredients used in the various products with high levels of caffeine being one of the most popular ingredients.

“Such products are typically regarded to be food supplements rather than medicines. In instances where slimming products contain ingredients that are regarded to be medicinal the MHRA will investigate whether there is a breach of human medicines regulations and take action accordingly.”

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Britain’s bad summer will see epidemic of vitamin D deficiency

Britain faces an epidemic of vitamin D deficiency which can cause rickets and is linked to cancer and other diseases because of the poor summer, a leading expert has warned.Britain's bad summer will see epidemic of vitamin D deficiencyProf Norman Ratcliffe, from Swansea University, said the dull summer will lead to high levels of deficiency in the sunshine vitamin.

Other experts said vitamin D deficiency was a ‘major public health concern’ and Britain was heading back to the 1920s when large numbers of children suffered bone pain and bowed legs from the effects of rickets.

The combination of a 21st Century childhood of not playing outside, being driven to school and constantly wearing high factor sunscreen will be compounded by the poor weather this summer, they said.

Most doctors have yet to ‘wake-up’ to the problem, it was argued.

Prof Ratcliffe said that because 2012 was one of the dullest summers on record, vitamin D stores have not been replenished in time for winter, when light levels in most of the UK are insufficient to make vitamin D.

Figures from the Met Office show that hours of sunshine in the summer of 2012 were 18 per cent lower than the average over the last 30 years and lower than at least any of the last ten summers.

Prof Ratcliffe said parts of northern England recorded sunshine hours in summer similar to late winter.

He said: “Unfortunately, the dull summer of 2012 will probably result in a record number of people with vitamin D deficiency.

“The situation in 2012 is probably much more serious than normal with the dull summer leading to even more people with vitamin D deficiency.

“This deficiency may be present almost continuously throughout 2012, commencing during the summer months rather than, as in previous years, in the winter and spring.

“Thus, vitamin D inadequacy may stretch over much of the period from June 2012 until the spring/summer of 2013.

“The effects of low vitamin D levels in the body are very serious as adequate levels may be necessary to prevent common cancers, heart and autoimmune diseases, rickets, osteomalacia (bone pain and muscle weakness), diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and depression.”

He said widespread fortification of foods with vitamin D and use of supplements was the only way to combat the problem, however pregnant women are not routinely informed that they should be taking vitamin D and vitamins for children under the Healthy Start programme are not promoted, Prof Clarke said.

Pregnant women, children under five, over 65s and people with dark skin are particularly vulnerable to vitamin D deficiency.

The vitamin is present in some foods but most is made by the body when exposed to sunlight and stored.

Prof Clarke said Kellogg’s have now added vitamin D to cornflakes and some other food manufacturers are beginning to talk about it.

Earlier this year Prof Dame Sally Davies, the Chief Medical Officer for England, highlighted the problem and said up to one in four people have low levels of vitamin D.

She said: “A significant proportion of people in the UK probably have inadequate levels of vitamin D in their blood.

“People at risk of vitamin D deficiency, including pregnant women and children under five, are already advised to take daily supplements.

“Our experts are clear – low levels of vitamin D can increase the risk of poor bone health, including rickets in young children.”

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Daily aspirin dose cuts cancer risk

A daily dose of aspirin for over 60s can cut their risk of cancer by up to 40 per cent and may offer protection after just a few years- researchers claim.Daily aspirin dose cuts cancer riskA study of more than 100,000 healthy people found that those who took a dose of aspirin every day were two fifths less likely to develop and die from stomach, oesophageal or colorectal cancer in the following decade.

They also had a 12 per cent lower risk of dying from other cancers, adding up to an overall 16 per cent lower risk of death from cancer of any type.

Although earlier research had found similar results, the new paper adds to the evidence in favour of taking the drug as a protective measure.

Doctors have previously called for low doses of aspirin to be taken from middle age, especially for people with a family history of cancer or heart disease, which it is also thought to protect against.

The authors of the latest study, Can Aspirin Reduce Cancer Risk and Mortality? published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, said: “Even a relatively modest benefit with respect to overall cancer mortality could still meaningfully influence the balances of risks and benefits of prophylactic (protective) aspirin use.”

The researchers, from the American Cancer Society, studied data on more than 100,000 healthy men and women, most of whom were over 60, and questioned them about their use of aspirin at regular intervals over the next decade.

They found that those who used aspirin every day were less likely to die from cancer in the following eleven years, with the biggest effect on cancers of the gastrointestinal tract.

Unlike previous research, the study found there was no difference between patients who had been taking the drug daily for less than five years, and those whose use was longer-term.

Referencing a separate study, the scientists said there was “some suggestion” the protective effect of aspirin could begin within three years of daily use.

In an editorial accompanying the article Dr John Baron of North Carolina University said the health benefit of aspirin estimated by the study could be “conservative”, adding: “The drug clearly reduces the incidence and mortality from luminal gastrointestinal cancers, and it may similarly affect other cancers.”

But Dr Eric Jacobs, who led the study, emphasised people should not take aspirin every day before discussing the potential side effects, such as stomach bleeds, with their doctors.

He said: “Although recent evidence about aspirin use and cancer is encouraging, it is still premature to recommend people start taking aspirin specifically to prevent cancer.

“Even low-dose aspirin can substantially increase the risk of serious gastrointestinal bleeding. Decisions about aspirin use should be made by balancing the risks against the benefits in the context of each individual’s medical history.”

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Eat fish twice a week to protect the heart

Everyone should eat two portions of fish a week to prevent heart disease leading experts are suggesting.Eat fish twice a week to protect the heartThe new guidance was compiled by the European Society of Cardiology at its conference EuroPrevent in Dublin.

One of the two portions consumed a week should be oily fish, such as salmon, mackeral, sardine or trout, they said as these contain the highest levels of omega 3 fatty acids.

Supplements can be taken by people who do not like fish but they should stick to pharmaceutical grade products because many over-the-counter capsules contain sufficient amounts of omega 3.

The recommendation was that those taking supplements should have 1g of omega 3.

Philip Calder, a metabolic biochemist and nutritionist from the University of Southampton, UK, said: “Omega-3 fatty acids are really important to human health, whether you’re talking about CVD, brain or immune health. Heath professionals have a key role to play in educating the public about the beneficial effects of including fish in their diets.”

Mr Calder added: “It’s important that health professionals give clear guidance around the need for patients to take 1g of omega-3 a day to achieve any beneficial effects.

“With over the counter brands containing different concentrations there’s a danger people may not be receiving sufficient intakes.”

“Fish, it needs to be remembered, don’t provide a total panacea against cardiovascular disease. As well as consuming fish, people need to eat healthy diets, not smoke and be physically active.”

If you would like to buy great value, pharmaceutical grade Omega 3 supplementst, please click here now. Share this:

Obesity rates around the world reviewed

Approximately 1.6 billion of the planet’s population are now overweight.Obesity rates around the world reviewed

Last November the United Nations announced that obesity was one of the biggest preventable issues facing the planet.

Here’s a guide to the countries crushing the scales:

America (70.8 per cent overweight)

According to a study from Yale University, five per cent of Americans would rather lose a limb than be obese. The majority, however, don’t appear to have a choice, and their country is becoming increasingly adept at making life comfortable for them. Boston Emergency Services in 2011 unveiled an ambulance for the obese. The vehicle is equipped with a stretcher that can hold 850lb and a hydraulic lift with a 1,000lb capacity to ensure the safety of the sick and stem back injuries among crews hoisting hefty patients. Brylane Home, a US retailer, offers an extensive selection of extra-wide and reinforced chairs, along with high-capacity scales and extra-large “Big John” loo seats. Police officers are now trained how to body search obese suspects “up in the folds”. The obese even have their own advocacy group, the National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance, whose recent objections to an “offensive” Disneyland exhibit on childhood obesity led to its closure.

Australia (63.7 per cent overweight)

Royal Adelaide Hospital recently announced a refurbishment to help staff cope with an influx of obese patients: bigger rooms with ceiling-mounted lifting apparatus, reinforced wheelchairs and beds, and larger CAT scanning machines. Staff are 19 times more likely to strain themselves moving obese patients than others.

Brazil (51.7 per cent overweight)

Along with an expanding economy comes expanding waistlines. Brazil is currently on track to be as obese as the US by 2022. Brazilians’ natural sweet tooth certainly doesn’t help – they lather sugar on already-sweet fruits like pineapple, and cafezinho, the national espresso-like coffee, is more sugar than liquid – and nor do their ideas on body image. As one commentator put it: “American men may focus on breasts, but the Brazilian man has always wanted something to grab on to.”

China (24.5 per cent overweight)

More than 325?million Chinese are now overweight or obese, a figure that could double in the next two decades. Fitness and slimming is a £700 million industry. Sales of weight-loss teas are rising sharply, and traditional Chinese treatments like acupuncture and fire-cupping are more popular than ever. Not that this makes things any easier for a Western brand like Weight Watchers, which has great difficultly assigning nutritional ”points” to dishes like “desert boat sails on green” (camel’s foot simmered with hearts of rape).

Colombia (48.3 per cent overweight) Perhaps the most exercise-friendly country in the world. Every Sunday morning in Bogotá, the roads are closed to cars to allow free reign for cyclists, roller bladers and joggers to safely exercise across the 120km of the ciclovía.

Finland (58 per cent overweight) 72 per cent of the country exercises regularly, helped by a government initiative that awards cash prizes to towns that lose the most weight. As part of the same programme, the Finnish government also encouraged shoe companies to make non-slip soles standard, so people wouldn’t be deterred from walking in icy weather.

France (50.7 per cent overweight) Contrary to the bestselling book, French women do get fat. Weight Watchers and Jenny Craig weight loss centres are signing new members in France in far greater numbers than in other markets, and offer such Gallic advice as “remember to have either dessert or cheese – but not both”.

Jamaica (55.3 per cent overweight) In Jamaican culture, a skinny – or “meagre” – woman is considered unattractive, while heaviness is a sign of happiness and social harmony. Which is why many women bulk up with black-market “chicken pills”, i.e. chicken feed with appetite-boosting arsenic. Side effects include diarrhoea, dermatitis and – eventually – cancer.

Malaysia (44.2 per cent overweight) Schoolchildren have had their body mass index printed on their report cards since 2011, to help parents keep track of their children’s weight.

Mauritania (36 per cent overweight) A local saying goes, “The glory of a man is measured by the fatness of his woman.”A third of women over 40 have said they were force-fed as children, to fall into local standards of beauty. The process is called gavage, a French word that describes the fattening up of geese to produce foie gras. A quarter of the 1.5 million women in the country are obese, contrasting sharply with most sub-Saharan countries. The government ran a television and radio campaign highlighting the health risks of obesity; because most Mauritanian love songs describe the ideal woman as fat, the health ministry commissioned catchy odes to thin women.

Mexico (68.1 per cent overweight) Since 1980, the percentage of overweight or obese Mexicans has tripled, and diabetes has become the leading cause of death. In some areas of the country, it’s easier to get a soft drink than a clean glass of water. The vast majority of Mexico City’s public schools, and many private schools, lack drinkable water; the consumption of soft drinks has increased 60 per cent over the past 14 years. Mexicans drink the most Coca-Cola per capita in the world. Since it enacted the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994, imports of processed food and drinks have soared. The average Mexican eats 433lb of bakery goods per year, compared with only 156lb of vegetables.

Nauru (94.5 per cent overweight) A 21 sq m island in the Pacific that qualifies as the world’s fattest nation, Nauru’s life expectancy for men is 59 years old and for women 64 years old. Phosphate mining, long a source of wealth, has left the island virtually incapable of growing vegetables. So islanders rely on processed Western imports – and a lot of them. “People [in Nauru] might only eat once a day,” says Professor Clive Moore of the University of Queensland, “but the plate could be 4in high.” As part of a recent government initiative, every Wednesday locals are encouraged to walk around the three mile airport perimeter, but it’s an uphill struggle. The islanders have, says Professor Moore, “a biological propensity to gain weight”.

Nigeria (26.8 per cent overweight) “Fattening rooms”, where women are encouraged to eat large amounts throughout the day, are popular in Nigeria, especially before weddings. A key ingredient is garri, a porridge made from cassava tubers.

Qatar (72.3 per cent overweight) With a GDP of $181.7 billion and a population of just under two million, per capita, Qatar is the richest nation on Earth. And it’s fast becoming the fattest, too. Sweltering temperatures of up to 41C make walking – or any kind of outdoor activity – unbearable. Social and family life revolves around five large meals, interspersed with snacks of tea and cake. The final meal of the day invariably comes from McDonald’s – delivered, of course. It’s predicted that within five years, 73 per cent of Qatari women and 69 per cent of the men will qualify as obese.

Saudi Arabia (69 per cent overweight) Girls are banned from participating in sports in Saudi state schools. The stance of the official Supreme Council of Religious Scholars is best summed up by Sheikh Abdullah al-Maneea, who said in 2009 that the excessive “movement and jumping” needed in football and basketball might cause girls to tear their hymens and lose their virginity. One third of women in Saudi Arabia are obese.

Sweden (53.3 per cent overweight) Obesity is on the rise in Sweden, but at a markedly slower rate than in other countries. In fact, the Swedes are now on track to overtake the Swiss as Europe’s slimmest people, thanks to a recent craze for high fat, low carb dieting. Endorsed by health authorities in 2008, the diet is now followed by one in four Swedes and its popularity was partly to blame for neighbouring Norway’s GreatButter Shortage of 2011. (Several resourceful Swedes were arrested attempting to smuggle butter across the border.)

Tonga (90.8 per cent overweight) Poor health and obesity are blamed on imported food like Spam, corned beef and “turkey tails” (a ban on the latter was recently lifted to ease membership of the World Trade Organisation). Tonga’s late king, Taufa’ahau Tupou IV, who died in 2006, was once the world’s heaviest monarch, weighing 440lb. He tried to persuade Tongans to get fit by offering cash incentives and taking up – in his seventies – bicycle rides around the island. (He shed 154lb.)

UAE (68.3 per cent overweight) When the UAE football team failed to qualify for the 2010 World Cup, defender Saleh Obaid blamed the team’s addiction to fast food. “We eat from McDonald’s. Everyone eats from McDonald’s. No good food.” McDonald’s was a sponsor of the 2010 World Cup.

UK (64.2 per cent overweight) Despite the Government’s three year old Change4Life campaign (latest recruit, television chef Ainsley Harriott) and Health Secretary Andrew Lansley’s call for the population to cut 5 billioncalories from its diet, obesity in the UK is getting worse. It causes an estimated 9,000 premature deaths a year, and if current trends continue, 90 per cent of British children will be obese by 2050.

Zimbabwe (25.5 per cent overweight) In 2004, the Zimbabwean government came up with what they called the “Obesity Tourism Strategy”. As Zimbabweans starve, overweight tourists would be encouraged to visit the country and work on farms seized from white farmers, losing weight in the process. “Tour organisers may promote this programme internationally and bring in tourists, while agriculturalists can employ the tourists as free farm labour. The tourists can then top it all by flaunting their slim bodies on a sundowner cruise.”

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Vitamin D deficiencies linked to cot deaths (SIDS)

Two senior paediatric pathologists say they have discovered vitamin D deficiency in a significant number of children who have died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome- cot deaths.Vitamin D deficiencies linked to cot deaths (SIDS)The two doctors, Dr Irene Scheimberg and Dr Marta Cohen, say that vitamin D deficiency and associated diseases such as the bone disease rickets could also explain deaths that are often thought to be suspicious.

Both doctors believe their findings merit further investigation and research.

The findings in children from London and Yorkshire followed the discovery by Dr Scheimberg in 2009 of congenital rickets in a four-month-old baby whose parents had been accused of shaking him to death.

Chana Al-Alas,19, and Rohan Wray, 22, were acquitted of murdering their son Jayden after the jury learned that his fractures, supposedly tell tale signs of abuse, could have been caused by his severe rickets. Dr Scheimberg also discovered rickets in Jayden’s mother.

Michael Turner QC, who defended Miss Al-Alas, told the BBC that he was shocked by the lack of knowledge about vitamin D deficiency of some of the expert witnesses at the trial, held at the Old Bailey.

In London, Dr Scheimberg discovered vitamin D deficiency in a further 30 cases. Vitamin D deficiency was found to be a cause of death in three cases. Cardiomyopathy, a disease of the heart muscle, was discovered in two small babies. A third died of hypocalcemic fits, a condition of low serum calcium levels in the blood caused by vitamin D deficiency.

Vitamin D deficiency was a co-existing finding in the sudden and unexpected deaths of eight children, so-called Sudden Infant Death or Sids; in five children with bronchial asthma and another five with combined bacteria-polyviral or polyviral infections. Two of the babies, including baby Jayden, also had rib fractures.

In Yorkshire, Dr Cohen found moderate to severe levels of vitamin D deficiency in 45 children, mostly infants aged less than 12 months, who died of natural causes. Of the 24 sudden infant deaths Dr Cohen investigated from this group, 18 – or 75% – were deficient in vitamin D.

Dr Scheimberg said severe vitamin D deficiency could make the bones of small babies very brittle and capable of fracture with little or no real force.

Dame Sally Davies Chief Medical Officer was quoted as “We need to investigate the vitamin D levels of these children carefully and the circumstances in which the bones fracture,” she explained.

“Obviously if you have bones that fracture easily then they will fracture easily they will fracture with any normal movement like trying to put a baby grow on a baby you will twist their arm. In a normal child you won’t produce anything. But in a child whose bones are weakened and [who have] an abnormal cartilage growth area, then it’s easier for them to get these very tiny fractures or even big fractures.”

Vitamin D is actually a hormone, and endocrinologists are experts in how the body is regulated by the hormone excreting glands – or endocrine organs.

Stephen Nussey is professor of endocrinology at St George’s Hospital at Tooting in south London. He believes that, despite repeated government recommendations on vitamin D supplementation, vitamin D deficiency is still not being taken sufficiently seriously by the authorities.

“Lizards are quite like humans in their vitamin D. Their dietary intake is pretty low and they need to have sun exposure and you need to have a light in the enclosure in which you keep your lizard of the right wavelength.

“If you don’t have one of those lights your reptile will get osteomalacia [adult rickets] very similar to humans. I guess the RSPCA would quite rightly prosecute you if you didn’t give your reptile vitamin D.

“But there’s no action taken against you if you don’t give it to your daughter. So that rather illustrates the importance placed on vitamin D for your reptile rather than giving it to your daughter.”

Earlier this week, the chief medical officer for England, Dame Sally Davies, wrote to doctors, nurses and other health professionals advising them to consider vitamin D supplementation for certain at risk groups, including pregnant mothers.

“We know a significant proportion of people in the UK probably have inadequate levels of vitamin D in their blood. People at risk of vitamin D deficiency, including pregnant women and children under five, are already advised to take daily supplements. Our experts are clear – low levels of vitamin D can increase the risk of poor bone health, including rickets in young children,” she explained.BUY NOWIf you have questions about Vitamin D, or you want to buy some great value Vitamin D supplements, please click here now

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Vitamin D supplements recommended by NHS health experts

The chief medical officer for England, Dame Sally Davies, is to contact medical staff about concerns young children and some adults are not getting enough vitamin D.Vitamin D supplements recommended by NHS health expertsGovernment guidelines recommend some groups, including the under-fives, should take a daily supplement.

However, recent research found that many parents and health professionals were unaware of the advice.

There has been an increase in childhood rickets over the past 15 years.

According to Dr Benjamin Jacobs, from the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, links to heart disease and some cancers are also being investigated.

The Feeding for Life Foundation report, published in October last year, suggested one in four toddlers in the UK is vitamin D deficient.

However, this may be an underestimate as only vitamin D from food was included, and not any vitamin D obtained through sun exposure.

Vitamin D supplements are recommended for all people at risk of a deficiency, including all pregnant and breastfeeding women, children under five years old, people aged over 65, and people at risk of not getting enough exposure to sunlight.

Vitamin D is mainly obtained from sunlight. However, too much sun exposure increases the risk of skin cancer.

According to one recent study, nearly three-quarters of parents and more than half of health professionals are unaware of the recommendations.

The Department of Health has asked the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition to review the issue of current dietary recommendations on vitamin D.

Dame Sally Davies: “We know a significant proportion of people in the UK probably have inadequate levels of vitamin D in their blood. People at risk of vitamin D deficiency, including pregnant women and children under five, are already advised to take daily supplements. Free supplements

“Our experts are clear – low levels of vitamin D can increase the risk of poor bone health, including rickets in young children.

“Many health professionals such as midwives, GPs and nurses give advice on supplements, and it is crucial they continue to offer this advice as part of routine consultations and ensure disadvantaged families have access to free vitamin supplements through our Healthy Start scheme.

“It is important to raise awareness of this issue, and I will be contacting health professionals on the need to prescribe and recommend vitamin D supplements to at-risk groups.”

It has long been known that vitamin D prevents rickets and children were once given food supplements like cod liver oil.

However, this practice was stopped in the 1950s because it was thought unnecessary.

In the last 10 years, doctors have been seeing more cases of vitamin D deficiency, leading to a debate over the use of food supplements and concern that many medical staff are unaware of the problem. BUY NOWIf you have questions about Vitamin D, or you want to buy some great value Vitamin D supplements, please click here now

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Omega fish oil supplements- high quality, ultra pure

Omega fish oil supplements- the basics:

  • Provides advanced and guaranteed levels of EPA and DHA, two long-chain omega-3 fatty acids important for memory and learning*
  • Supports sound cardiovascular, immune, health and joint health*
  • Critical for promoting healthy pregnancies and healthy babies*
  • Plays a role in many important cellular processes critical to the body’s survival*
  • Supports healthy inflammatory response*

Omega fish oil supplements- high quality, ultra pureBiOmega Difference

  • Each capsule delivers 100 IU of vitamin D
  • Formulated with lemon oil to eliminate the fishy aftertaste associated with most fish oil supplements

USANA Difference

  • Effective
  • Safe
  • Science-based
  • Pharmaceutical Quality

You know that fish oil is really good for you because it contains important omega-3 fatty acids, which contribute to brain development , cellular function, and immune, joint, and cardiovascular health.

They also support healthy inflammatory response. But storing fish and cooking it properly is a hassle.

And when you have a busy lifestyle, eating fish out every night can get pretty pricey, pretty quick.

BiOmega is a fish oil supplement that’s easy to take every day, especially when you don’t feel like you’re getting enough fish in your diet. What makes BiOmega exceptional is that it has all the benefits of fish oil in a convenient gel capsule, and it is essentially free of harmful contaminants like mercury because of its triple distillation process.

It also contains concentrated doses of DHA, a beneficial fat that supports memory and learning, and is greatly recommended for pregnant women. And BiOmega contains an additional dose of vitamin D, a nutrient found deficient in the average diet.

BiOmega is also formulated with lemon oil to kill the fishy aftertaste found in other fish oil supplements. Because of its exclusive advantages, when you buy BiOmega, you know you’re getting quite the catch!

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Vitamin D deficiencies lead to rise of rickets in the UK

Vitamin D deficiencies are creating a big increase in the number of children suffering from rickets.Vitamin D deficiencies lead to rise of rickets in the UKRickets was common in the early 1900s but had almost disappeared from Britain. However, a recent study carried out by Professor Nicholas Clarke, a consultant orthopaedic surgeon at Southampton General Hospital, found there were 185 cases in 2001 and that figure rose to 479 cases in 2009.

The data was from 42 Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) which responded to the survey, commissioned by Kelloggs.

Professor Clarke said: “I saw an infant a month ago who was referred to me because of delayed walking. The child was 15 months old and could not stand physically.”

He acknowledges the balance parents have to strike, but lifestyle changes concern him greatly.  Rickets causes the bones to soften and legs to bow.

A lack of exposure to sunlight can lead to a vitamin D deficiency, which causes the disease.

It helps control the amount of calcium we absorb and is important for the development of strong bones.  Without it rickets can develop which cause bones to soften and usually legs appear bowed.

What is Vitamin D?

Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin because our skin can produce vitamin D from the sun’s ultra violet light (UVB). It helps control the amount of calcium we absorb therefore and is important for developing and maintaining strong bones.

Why do we need Vitamin D?

A lack of Vitamin D can reduce the body’s ability to absorb calcium, and have a negative impact on bone health.

Health Care Professionals are seeing more cases of children with Rickets in their hospitals due to a lack of Vitamin D. 82% of Paediatric Dietitians say they have seen an increase in Rickets over the last 5 years.*

Rickets is a condition that affects growing bones – so it only occurs in children. It is a softening of the bones that can lead to fractures and deformity.

Why children don’t have enough Vitamin D in the UK?

There is a combination of reasons for children not getting enough Vitamin D – spending more time indoors and not playing outside, and covering up with sunblock means they are not exposed to the sun. Also there are few foods that provide Vitamin D, and children may not be taking supplements when it is recommended – worryingly many children are not getting enough of this important vitamin.

Who is at risk of Vitamin D Deficiency:

Some groups of the population are thought to be at high risk of deficiency. These include:

  •     Pregnant or breast feeding women
  •     Breast fed infants from 6 months
  •     Formula fed infants, if formula fed is less than 500mls a day
  •     Children up to 5 years
  •     People with dark skin pigmentation
  •     The elderly (over 64 years)
  •     People who don’t go outside much
  •     People who cover skin with clothing for majority of summer months e.g. religious reasons
  •     People with poor or restricted diet

    How to get Vitamin D

Spend 15-20 mins outside in sunshine 2-3 times each week without suncream. Encourage children to play outside, take a brisk walk or do some gardening?

Try to eat oily types of fish regularly (at least 1-2/week). This includes salmon, trout, mackerel, herrings or sardines.

Choose a breakfast cereal with added vitamin D (not all cereals are fortified so check the label). Kellogg’s Cornflakes, Kellogg’s Choc N Roll, Special K and Bran Flakes all include Vitamin D. We are adding it to all of our children’s cereals by July 2012.

Ensure that babies and young children have a vitamin D supplement, e.g. Healthy Start vitamin drops from the Healthy Visitor and if you are pregnant speak to your GP about taking vitamin D supplements.

    Should I give my child Vitamin D supplements?

The Department of Health has recommended vitamin D supplements for infants and children up to the ages of 5 years, as well as pregnant and breast feeding mothers.

If you have questions about Vitamin D, or you want to buy some great value Vitamin D supplements, please click here now BUY NOW

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