Archive for December 2012

Multi Vitamins wishes you a healthy New Year in 2013

Multi Vitamins wishes you a healthy New Year in 2013.Multi Vitamins wishes you a healthy New Year in 2013Multi Vitamins wishes you a happy and healthy New Year in 2013.

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Multi Vitamins wishes you a Merry Christmas

Multi Vitamins wishes you a Merry Christmas.Multi Vitamins wishes you a Merry ChristmasMulti Vitamins wishes you a healthy and Merry Christmas.

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To improve your health- UK patients will be able to view your NHS records online

In plans to improve your health- NHS patients will be given online access to their health records in the next three years under plans announced by the Government.To improve your health- UK patients will be able to view your NHS records onlineDoctors’ surgeries will have to set up services to allow anyone to see their health files, book appointments and order repeat prescriptions on the internet.

People will also be given detailed information on the survival rates and success of treatments in their areas, so they can choose to go to more “successful” hospitals or doctors if they wish.

A Government source said: “Many people are juggling longer working hours with caring for children and older relatives.  Looking after their own health, and the health of their families needs to be as straightforward as possible.”

“Looking after our health should be easy — in an age where people can do their banking or shopping online, it should be just as simple to view your health records, order a repeat prescription or book a GP appointment.”

The move for online health records comes despite the decision by Andrew Lansley, the previous health secretary, to cancel a massive NHS national database amid fears over its cost and security concerns.

However the new online plan will be operated at a local level. Patients will have to opt-in to the system to read their records over the internet. Paramedics and other medical experts will also be given access to the records of those making use of the system.

It will be introduced before the next election in 2015 in a move described as a “watershed” for the NHS. The proposal is one of the key planks of the new NHS mandate being announced by the Government.

The mandate is a set of instructions given by ministers to improve the health service following the Coalition’s reforms. Under the plans, people will be able to enter their postcode into a new system to assess the effectiveness of health treatment in their local areas.

From: http://www.dyenamicsolutions.com/uk-patients-will-view-their-nhs-records-online-in-three-years

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Exercise could repair heart damage

Vigorous daily exercise could repair damage caused by a heart attack, a new study has suggested.Exercise could repair heart damageResearchers found for the first time that regular and strenuous exercise can make dormant stem cells in the heart spring into life, leading to the development of new heart muscle.

Scientists had already discovered that stem cells could be coaxed into producing new tissue through injections of chemicals known as growth factors, but the new study is the first to suggest that a simple exercise programme has a similar effect.

The findings suggest that damage from heart disease or failure could be at least partially repaired through 30 minutes of running or cycling a day, at enough intensity to work up a sweat.

An early-stage study on healthy rats showed that an equivalent amount of exercise resulted in more than 60 per cent of heart stem cells, which are usually dormant in adults, becoming active.

After just two weeks of exercise the mice had a seven per cent increase in the number of cardiomyocites, the “beating” cells in heart tissue, researchers reported in the European Heart Journal.

The team from Liverpool John Moores University said they would now study the effects on mice which had suffered heart attacks to determine whether it could have an even greater benefit.

Dr Georgina Ellison, who led the study, said: “The exercise is increasing the growth factors which are activating the stem cells to go on and repair the heart, and this is the first time that this potential has been shown.

“We hope it might be even more effective in damaged hearts because you have got more reason to replace the large amount of cells that are lost.”

Although some patients with severe heart damage may not be capable of intensive exercise, Dr Ellison said a significant number would easily be able to jog or cycle for 30 minutes a day without risking their health.

“In a normal cardiac rehabilitation programme patients do undertake exercise, but what we are saying is maybe to be more effective it needs to be carried out at a higher intensity, in order to activate the resident stem cells,” she said.

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Glass of wine a day fights breast cancer

Women with breast cancer can boost their chances of surviving the disease by drinking a glass of wine a day, according to research.Glass of wine a day fights breast cancerThose who drink a medium-sized (175ml) glass a day cut their chance of dying within a decade of diagnosis by a fifth – from 20 to 16 per cent, say Cambridge University doctors.

Even drinking half that cut the chance to 18 per cent, they found.

Dr Paul Pharoah, from the university’s department of public health and primary care, said that their findings suggested women should not deny themselves the odd drink.

He said: “What our study says is that it is reasonable, if you are diagnosed with breast cancer, to enjoy the occasional drink of alcohol.  You shouldn’t feel that you should deny yourself the enjoyment of moderate alcohol.”

Dr Pharoah was speaking at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool, where he was presenting results from a study conducted with the South Egypt Cancer Institute.

They looked at 13,525 women who had been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer, who they followed for up to 15 years.

Those who drank seven units a week cut the chance of dying from breast cancer in a decade from 20 to 18 per cent, and those who drank 14 units weekly reduced the chance to 16 per cent.

The study did not look at how drinking more than 14 units a week might affect a women’s chances of survival.

The study found there was a “slightly stronger” benefit for those women with oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancers. These tend to be more aggressive but only affect a minority of patients.

The benefit was a little weaker among women with oestrogen-receptor positive breast cancers, which account for about three-quarters of cases.

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Baggy eyes and baldness are heart attack signs

Bags around the eyes and baldness are telltale signs of being at a high risk of heart attack, a study has found.Baggy eyes and baldness are heart attack signsThey indicate the true “biological age” of a person rather than their numerical age, said Danish researchers.

They found that people who exhibited four key visual signs of ageing were 57 per cent more likely to suffer a heart attack, they were also 39 per cent more likely to be diagnosed with any type of heart disease.

Hair loss of either type was not linked to an increased risk of heart disease or attack in women, however, it was in men. Those with receding hair had a 40 per cent higher chance of a heart attack than those without.

Professor Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen, from Copenhagen University, said: “Checking these visible aging signs should be a routine part of every doctor’s physical examination.”

She and colleagues reached their conclusions by following the health of 10,885 people over 40, for a 35-year period. Almost half were women. Over that period, 3,401 developed heart disease and 1,708 had a heart attack.

They then looked at which participants exhibited four signs of visual ageing at the start of the study: yellow fatty deposits around the lower or upper eyelids; receding hairline at the temples; baldness at the crown of the head; and earlobe creases. Participants’ gender was taken into account when calculating the results.

Baggy eyelids were the strongest predictor of heart disease and heart attack. Called xanthelasmata by doctors, these markings are mostly made up of cholesterol.

The study Telltale visible signs of aging may predict heart disease was presented at the annual conference of the American Heart Association in Los Angeles.

Risks of heart disease and attack increased with each individual sign.

Prof Tybjaerg-Hansen said: “The visible signs of aging reflect physiologic or biological age, not chronological age, and are independent of chronological age.”

However, for those who look a little past their prime, the study also held good news. The researchers discovered that people with grey hair and wrinkles were no more at risk than those with smoother skin and more colourful locks.

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Exercising in your 70s may stop brain shrinkage

Exercising in your 70s may stop your brain from shrinking and showing the signs of ageing linked to dementia, say experts from Edinburgh University.Exercising in your 70s may stop brain shrinkageBrain scans of 638 people past the age of retirement showed those who were most physically active had less brain shrinkage over a three-year period.

Exercise did not have to be strenuous – going for a walk several times a week sufficed. But giving the mind a workout by doing a tricky crossword had little impact.

The study found no real brain-size benefit from mentally challenging activities, such as reading a book, or other pastimes such as socialising with friends and family.

When the researchers examined the brain’s white matter – the wiring that transmits messages round the brain – they found that the people over the age of 70 who were more physically active had fewer damaged areas than those who did little exercise.

And they had more grey matter – the parts of the brain where the messages originate.

Experts already know that our brains tend to shrink as we age and that this shrinkage is linked to poorer memory and thinking and previous studies have shown that exercise helps reduce the risk of dementia and can slow down its onset.

But scientists are still baffled about why this is.

Exercise increases blood flow to the brain, delivering oxygen and nutrients to brain cells, which may be important.

Or it may be that as people’s brains shrink, they become less inclined to exercise.

Regardless of why, experts say the findings are good news because exercise is an easy thing to do to boost health.

Prof James Goodwin, head of research at Age UK, the charity that provided the funding for the research, said: “This research re-emphasises that it really is never too late to benefit from exercise, so whether it’s a brisk walk to the shops, gardening or competing in a fun run it is crucial that, those of us who can, get active as we grow older.”

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New food labelling system to start in 2013

A consistent system of front of pack food labelling will be introduced in the UK in 2013 the government has announced.New food labelling system to start in 2013A combination of guideline daily amounts, colour coding and “high, medium or low” wording will be used to show how much fat, salt and sugar and how many calories are in each product.

The scheme will be voluntary, but ministers are confident they have the food industry on board.

Talks will take place over the exact design of the labels. If those discussions go well it could mark the end of what has been a long-running campaign to introduce front of pack labelling.

The issue has been under discussion for the past decade with campaigners seeing it as a way of tackling the rising rates of obesity.

But the introduction of a consistent system has proved difficult, and instead a range of different labels have gradually been introduced over the years.

Despite the government’s confident announcement, this is still not quite a done deal.

Within the food industry – and particularly among manufacturers rather than the supermarkets themselves – there are still grumblings about front of pack labelling.

But after years of discussions and research and a detailed consultation over the summer, ministers are effectively sticking their necks out to force the sector over the line.

If a consistent system is not in place by the summer of next year the government will feel it can lay the blame elsewhere.

Some retailers and manufacturers have used “traffic-light” labelling, in which the least healthy foods are labelled red and the most healthy are in green, while others use guideline daily amounts – or GDAs – which give the percentage of recommended intake. Some use both.

There has also been confusion over how a system could be introduced.

To make it mandatory, regulations would have to be agreed on a European level, but agreement between countries has been hard to reach.

So the situation has meant that the UK government sought to introduce a voluntary system.

Public Health Minister Anna Soubry said: “The UK already has the largest number of products with front-of-pack labels in Europe, but research has shown that consumers get confused by the wide variety of labels used.

“By having a consistent system we will all be able to see, at a glance, what is in our food. This will help us all choose healthier options and control our calorie intake.

“Obesity and poor diet cost the NHS billions of pounds every year. Making small changes to our diet can have a big impact on our health and could stop us getting serious illnesses – such as heart disease – later in life.”

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Eating chips in pregnancy can cause underweight babies

Eating chips during pregnancy can lead to significant health problems for new born babies new research suggests.Eating chips in pregnancy can cause underweight babiesConsuming a vast quantity of chips, crisps and biscuits during pregnancy can lead to babies having a lower than average birth weight, the study found.

Mothers-to-be who have a high intake of acrylamide – which is found in commonly consumed foods and coffee – are also more likely to have a baby which has a smaller head circumference.

The size of a child’s head has been associated with delayed neurodevelopment while lower birth weights have been associated with adverse health effects in early life and as children grow up.

Babies born to mothers with a high dietary intake of acrylamide were found to be up to 132 grams lighter than babies born to mothers who had a low intake, researchers said.

The mean birth weight among children who were exposed to the highest levels of acrylamide compared with children in the lowest was around 100 grams, the authors said.

The effect caused by acrylamide is comparable to lower birth weights caused by maternal smoking, they said.

The infant’s heads were also up to 0.33 centimetres smaller, they found.

Acrylamide is a chemical which is produced naturally in food as a result of cooking starch-rich food at high temperatures, such as when baking or frying. It has been found in a wide range of home-cooked and processed foods including crisps, chips, bread and coffee.

“The potential public-health implications of our findings are substantial,” the authors said.

“Reduced birth weight is a risk factor for numerous adverse health effects early in life, and has been associated with multiple adverse outcomes later in life such as reduced stature, increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and osteoporosis.”

They added: “These findings provide evidence supporting the need for changes in food production and for providing clear public health advice to pregnant women to reduce their dietary intake of foods that may contain high concentrations of acrylamide.”

Researchers examined the diets of 1,100 pregnant women between 2006 and 2010 in Denmark, England, Greece, Norway and Spain.

The study A comparative analysis of dietary intakes during pregnancy in Europe , led by the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL) in Barcelona, involved 20 research centres across Europe including the Born in Bradford research programme.

Dr Laura Hardie, reader in molecular epidemiology at the University of Leeds, said: “186 women from the Born in Bradford study took part in this major European research programme. We found that their babies had the highest levels of acrylamide out of all of the five centres, almost twice the level of the Danish babies.

“When we investigated their diet it was clear that the largest source of dietary acrylamide is from chips.”

CREAL researcher and lead author Dr Marie Pedersen, added: “The public-health implications of the findings in this study are substantial.

“Reduced birth weight, in particular low birth weight, has been shown to be related to numerous adverse health effects early or later in life such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Furthermore, reduced birth head circumference has been associated with delayed neurodevelopment.”

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